Have a Safe Holiday Season with Your Pet

Holiday Pet Safety Tips in New York, NY

During the holiday season, there are so many dangers our pets may encounter, but if a few extra precautions are taken, you can keep your best friend safe. The team at St. Marks Veterinary Hospital wants to help you make sure that everyone in your family is safe and happy all season long.

Top 5 Most Common Holiday Dangers for Pets

These are some of the most common dangers that the St. Marks Veterinary Hospital team often sees at our animal hospital during the holiday season:

  • While we can handle having a few drinks in celebration of the season, our pets cannot. It’s important to always keep alcoholic beverages out your of your pet’s reach to ensure that they’re safe from the danger of alcohol poisoning.
  • Christmas trees. It isn’t the holiday season without a festive tree! However, these lovely decorations can also cause a few hazards in the home. Christmas trees can be knocked over by overly adventurous and curious pets, causing damage to the home and injury to the animals!
  • Electrical cords. Does your best friend like to chew? The sight of all those new cords under the tree may be too appealing for your pet, so we recommend disguising and hiding electrical cords to prevent your pet’s curiosity. It’s also important that they never be left unattended around the decorations!
  • Holiday meals and sweets. You hear all year round that there are foods your pet should never consume, but during the holiday season we have so much more of those dangerous foods around the house! Traditional holiday meals contain so many of those dangers, like poultry bones, onions, garlic, grapes, and more. In addition, we often do a lot of baking during the holidays, introducing our pets to even more potential dangers with chocolate, sugar, macadamia nuts, raisins, and more. Keep those foods and treats out of your pet’s reach at all times!
  • Poinsettias and other holiday plants. For some odd reason, the most popular plants to bring inside the home at the holidays are toxic to your pet! Poinsettias, amaryllis, and lilies of all kinds are dangerous and we recommend keeping them out of your pet’s reach at all times so that your pet doesn’t have access to the leaves or berries that may fall off. You may also want to consider purchasing silk flowers for the look of the festive plant without the dangers.

If you have any questions about your pet’s safety and well-being this holiday season, please contact our team at St. Marks Veterinary Hospital. That’s what we’re here for! Have a happy and safe holiday with your pet this year.

Dental Disease: The Silent Killer

Cat and Dog Dental Disease

There is nothing pretty about pet dental disease, and unfortunately more than 70% of all pets have some form of it by the time they are only 3 years of age! Some of the negative results of this silent killer are:

  • Pain while eating
  • Tooth loss
  • Bad breath
  • The development of other diseases because of toxins seeping into the bloodstream
  • …and more

How to Offset Dental Disease for Your Pet

Offsetting dental disease can be done in a number of ways, the most important of which is professional veterinary dental care. When your pet comes in for their regular, annual check-ups, our dental team will examine their oral cavity to determine whether a professional dental cleaning is necessary for their care.

If a dental cleaning is recommended, our veterinary team will perform this procedure under anesthesia at a prescheduled time separate from your pet’s annual physical. During this procedure, your pet’s teeth with be scaled to remove tartar and plaque buildup, cleaned, and polished. Any diseased teeth may need to be extracted if they can’t be saved. Your pet will be safely monitored under anesthesia as they would be during any surgical procedure.

Continued Dental Care

After your pet’s professional dental, at-home dental care is important to keep their teeth from developing more tartar and plaque buildup. We can recommend a number of dental products for keeping your pet’s teeth clean. Please talk with our team today about the importance of proper preventive care for your pet’s oral health.

Make Sure They Can Get Home: Check Your Pet’s Microchip

Is your pet’s microchip up-to-date? If your pet were lost, would an animal hospital or shelter be able to contact you once your pet was found?

Calico cat in the studio.

It’s important to get your pet microchipped; but it’s just as important to make sure that microchip contains the correct information in order for your four-legged friend to get home.

How does a microchip work?
The microchip, which is about the size of a grain of rice, is injected by a veterinarian or veterinary technician just beneath your pet’s skin in the area between the shoulder blades. This is usually done without anesthesia, and the experience can be compared to getting a vaccination.

Each microchip has a unique registration number that is entered into a database or registry, and is associated with your name and contact information. If your lost dog or cat is found by an animal hospital, shelter or humane society, they will use a microchip scanner to read the number and contact the registry to get your information.

Make sure you can be found, too
While it may be comforting to know the microchip won’t get lost or damaged, and that it will probably last the pet’s lifetime, the microchip is useless if you’re not updating your contact information with the registry. If your pet has been microchipped, keep the documentation paperwork so you can find the contact information for the registry. If you don’t have the documentation paperwork, contact the veterinarian or shelter where the chip was implanted.

Keep in mind there are more than a dozen companies that maintain databases of chip ID numbers in the U.S. By using AAHA’s Universal Pet Microchip Lookup at petmicrochiplookup.org, you can locate the registry for your chip by entering the microchip ID number. If you don’t have your pet’s microchip ID number, have a veterinarian scan it and give it to you.

Only about 17% of lost dogs and 2% of lost cats ever find their way back to their owners. Prevent the heartache and ensure your pet has an up-to-date microchip.

 

Originally published by Healthy Pet.