Winter Pet Safety

 

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Now that the cold weather is finally here, there are a few tips we want to share with you to make sure your pets stay safe and healthy during the winter months.

Make sure you remember to have extra water and food available for your pets in case the inclement weather prevents you from leaving the apartment (or more likely, prevents delivery of supplies from various sources we Manhattanites are so dependent upon). If your pet is on medication, do not wait until you are down to the last pill to call for a refill.

 
For those with old, arthritic pets, make sure they have a nice, soft, warm bed. Their arthritis may be worse with the cold weather. Please consult your vet to discuss various ways to manage pain. Heating pads can be dangerous and cause electric shock or thermal burn, especially if your pet likes to chew on cords or even the pad itself, or if they are debilitated and cannot move away from pad.

Small dogs, dogs with less fur or body fat, young puppies, old dogs, especially those with chronic diseases (such as kidney disease, Cushing’s, etc.) are more susceptible to the cold. To prevent hypothermia, have them wear a warm coat when out and keep the walks short.

If possible, put booties on your dogs to protect their paws from ice and salt. If you cannot get booties on your dog, use a small amount of petroleum jelly, or get a commercially available product called “Musher’s Secret Paw Protector” and apply on the paws before heading out. Remember to clean the paws thoroughly when you get home and inspect closely for any cuts or irritation, particularly in the areas between the pads.

Beware of icy patches and wet areas on metal grates/covers and certain stone surfaces as these can be very slippery. Slipping and falling can cause sprains, ligament tears, fractures, etc. As the ice and snow melt, don’t let your dog drink the melted water as it is often contaminated with the deicing salt, which can cause diarrhea and even toxicity if they use deicers that are not pet safe. Also, beware of antifreeze. It is sweet tasting and dogs like licking it. Antifreeze damages the kidneys and is deadly without immediate medical treatment.

Finally, watch out for things that can cause shock or electrocution. Don’t let your dog sniff
around open light post covers as there are often exposed wires and can electrocute your dog. Also, avoid stepping on any ConEd junction box covers, manhole covers, metal grates, etc. These metal covers on the ground may have stray voltage that can cause anything from a nasty shock to electrocution. It is especially worse in the winter when the salt mixed with melting slush seeps under these covers and corrodes the wires and conduct the electricity from the faulty wiring to the metal covers.

–Dr Corinna Lai

How to Introduce Your Cat to a New Friend

How to Introduce Your Cat to a New Friend

Are you the owner of a single cat? You may worry about your friend being lonely while you’re working or spending time away from the home. It’s a natural concern as you and your pet are close and enjoy each other’s company when you can make time for each other. Many single pet owners ask us the question, “Should I get another pet?” This isn’t always a simple question to answer, but we can shed some light on the situation for you.

If you’re adding a new friend to your family, it’s important that your old friend is comfortable with the new addition.

Bringing Your New Cat Home

When you choose to bring a new pet into your home, St. Mark’s Veterinary Hospital recommends ushering them in in a crate or box provided by the shelter. Take time introducing the new pet into the home by initially setting up a quarantine room where the new cat can become accustomed to their new home. In this space, we recommend setting up everything the new kitty will enjoy, including a litter box, dishes, toys, a bed, and scratching post. The new cat and your existing pet will be able to hear and smell each other, growing accustomed to each other, but will not be in a confrontational situation face-to-face.

Cats Meeting Face-to-Face

When your existing cat begins to appear more comfortable, it’s important to let them get a visual of each other before actually meeting face-to-face. A gate or see-through barrier is often the best way to achieve this. After that meeting goes without too much trouble, it may be time to let the two interact in the main area.

If the new cat is a kitten, the initial interaction may be more pleasant than if the new cat is an adult. You should be armed with a sprayer bottle and some toys or treats in case a fight breaks out. Depending on how well the first meeting goes, it may be necessary to separate the cats again and try later for a more pleasant meeting.

If you’re having trouble introducing a new friend to the family or are looking for tips, please contact our team for assistance. We are here to help you make your best friend’s life a good one!

Have a Safe Holiday Season with Your Pet

Holiday Pet Safety Tips in New York, NY

During the holiday season, there are so many dangers our pets may encounter, but if a few extra precautions are taken, you can keep your best friend safe. The team at St. Marks Veterinary Hospital wants to help you make sure that everyone in your family is safe and happy all season long.

Top 5 Most Common Holiday Dangers for Pets

These are some of the most common dangers that the St. Marks Veterinary Hospital team often sees at our animal hospital during the holiday season:

  • While we can handle having a few drinks in celebration of the season, our pets cannot. It’s important to always keep alcoholic beverages out your of your pet’s reach to ensure that they’re safe from the danger of alcohol poisoning.
  • Christmas trees. It isn’t the holiday season without a festive tree! However, these lovely decorations can also cause a few hazards in the home. Christmas trees can be knocked over by overly adventurous and curious pets, causing damage to the home and injury to the animals!
  • Electrical cords. Does your best friend like to chew? The sight of all those new cords under the tree may be too appealing for your pet, so we recommend disguising and hiding electrical cords to prevent your pet’s curiosity. It’s also important that they never be left unattended around the decorations!
  • Holiday meals and sweets. You hear all year round that there are foods your pet should never consume, but during the holiday season we have so much more of those dangerous foods around the house! Traditional holiday meals contain so many of those dangers, like poultry bones, onions, garlic, grapes, and more. In addition, we often do a lot of baking during the holidays, introducing our pets to even more potential dangers with chocolate, sugar, macadamia nuts, raisins, and more. Keep those foods and treats out of your pet’s reach at all times!
  • Poinsettias and other holiday plants. For some odd reason, the most popular plants to bring inside the home at the holidays are toxic to your pet! Poinsettias, amaryllis, and lilies of all kinds are dangerous and we recommend keeping them out of your pet’s reach at all times so that your pet doesn’t have access to the leaves or berries that may fall off. You may also want to consider purchasing silk flowers for the look of the festive plant without the dangers.

If you have any questions about your pet’s safety and well-being this holiday season, please contact our team at St. Marks Veterinary Hospital. That’s what we’re here for! Have a happy and safe holiday with your pet this year.

Diabetes Awareness: Is Your Pet At Risk?

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If you’re a pet owner, it’s important to be aware of your pet’s risk for diabetes. Certain breeds are more prone to diabetes than others, but these are not the only characteristics to consider in your pet’s level of risk.

Risk factors for diabetes often include:

  • Age – pets that are over the age of seven are more likely to develop diabetes
  • Sex – female dogs are at a greater risk than male dogs
  • Breeds – diabetes is observed in certain dog breeds including Bichon Frises, Cairn terriers, golden retrievers, German shepherds, poodles, schnauzers, and more
  • Existing health conditions
  • Obesity
  • Poor diet

There are many signs of diabetes that pet owners should be aware of as well. For example, did you know that increased thirst and urination can be a symptom of diabetes in your pet?

Testing for Diabetes

The St. Marks Veterinary Hospital team recommends that all pets with any of the risk factors for diabetes be tested for the disease. There may be signs that your pet has already acquired diabetes, such as increased thirst and urination (although these can be signs of other conditions as well), increased appetite, weight loss, decreased energy, increased sleepiness, urinary tract infections, vision problems, weakness in rear limbs (in cats), kidney failure, and more.

If we observe any of these symptoms in your pet, we will test them for diabetes and other possible chronic conditions. Bringing your pet in to St. Marks Veterinary Hospital for regular check-ups, ongoing testing for possible health issues, and medical attention whenever signs of illness manifest themselves are important aspects of your pet’s ongoing health.

Schedule a Visit at St. Marks Veterinary Hospital

Have questions about your best friend’s health care needs? Please contact us today for assistance and we’ll be happy to help.

Thanksgiving and Your Pets – Keeping Them Safe


IMG_5509 The holiday season is fast approaching. As you prepare for the first family feast of the season, the Suffolk County S.P.C.A. asks that you remember your pets in the preparation of these festivities.

1)  Avoid feeding your pet table scraps – as this may cause at a minimum weight gain, and we all want to avoid that this season. Keep turkey bones away from your pets. These dangerous treats can cause obstructions, choking and damage to the intestines.  Bones can splinter on consumption and cause grave injury.

2)  Pets thrive on routine. Please make sure that your holiday guests understand your pet’s “house rules” when it comes to play time, treats, jumping, getting on counters, table scraps, and the like. Help them to keep your pet mindful of its training and good manners.

3)  Chocolate should be kept out of your pet’s reach all the time. It is a toxic substance to animals, particularly dogs. It can cause heart problems, central nervous system problems.  Dark chocolate is the most toxic and can be fatal. Walnuts and macadamia nuts can cause severe vomiting and diarrhea. Avocado can cause buildup of fluid in internal organs and cause damage to the heart. Onions and garlic can cause severe anemia especially in cats. Raisins and grapes can cause significant kidney damage and result in renal failure.

4)  Be careful with candles and do not leave them unattended as a wayward tail can cause a fire.

5)  Close that oven door promptly lest a cat jump inside seeking a warm place.

6)  Secure the trash can so that dogs cannot tip them over and get into items that could be harmful.

7)  Thanksgiving means winter is coming. As you prepare for the cold, be sure to clean up those antifreeze spills right away. The sweet smell of this highly poisonous substance attracts pets to it.

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SOURCE: Your Local SPCA Serving Suffolk County   

Diabetes Awareness: Is Your Pet At Risk?

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If you’re a pet owner, it’s important to be aware of your pet’s risk for diabetes. Certain breeds are more prone to diabetes than others, but these are not the only characteristics to consider in your pet’s level of risk.

Risk factors for diabetes often include:

  • Age – pets that are over the age of seven are more likely to develop diabetes
  • Sex – female dogs are at a greater risk than male dogs
  • Breeds – diabetes is observed in certain dog breeds including Bichon Frises, Cairn terriers, golden retrievers, German shepherds, poodles, schnauzers, and more
  • Existing health conditions
  • Obesity
  • Poor diet

There are many signs of diabetes that pet owners should be aware of as well. For example, did you know that increased thirst and urination can be a symptom of diabetes in your pet?

Testing for Diabetes

The St. Marks Veterinary Hospital team recommends that all pets with any of the risk factors for diabetes be tested for the disease. There may be signs that your pet has already acquired diabetes, such as increased thirst and urination (although these can be signs of other conditions as well), increased appetite, weight loss, decreased energy, increased sleepiness, urinary tract infections, vision problems, weakness in rear limbs (in cats), kidney failure, and more.

If we observe any of these symptoms in your pet, we will test them for diabetes and other possible chronic conditions. Bringing your pet in to St. Marks Veterinary Hospital for regular check-ups, ongoing testing for possible health issues, and medical attention whenever signs of illness manifest themselves are important aspects of your pet’s ongoing health.

Schedule a Visit at St. Marks Veterinary Hospital

Have questions about your best friend’s health care needs? Please contact us today for assistance and we’ll be happy to help.

Fall Safety Tips for Pets

Pet Safety Tips in New York, NY

The fall season is a beautiful time of year, with brightly colored leaves, crisp weather, and delicious treats, but it can also be a dangerous time of year for our pets! The veterinary team at St. Mark’s Veterinary Hospital provides a number of pet safety tips to ensure that your best friends are safe all season long!

  1. Halloween Candy. Sugary, sugar free, and chocolate treats are all dangerous for our pets if consumed, so always remember to keep them out of reach!
  2. Pumpkins and Candles. Lit candles can cause serious burn injuries if knocked over, so we recommend that you use battery-operated candles in your jack-o-lanterns this fall.
  3. When you’re choosing your pet’s Halloween costume this year, be sure that it’s comfortable and properly fitting. If your pet appears uncomfortable at any point, we recommend removing the costume promptly.
  4. Pest Preventives. The fall season is a huge time for fleas and ticks to be searching for a warm host. Remember to keep using pest preventives all year round!
  5. The lawn fertilizers used at the end of the season are stronger and can be more dangerous than summer fertilizers. Be sure to follow all application instructions, including recommendations for keeping your pet off the lawn.
  6. Antifreeze is a commonly-used cold-weather chemical that can poison our pets if consumed! The bad news is that it smells and tastes sweet to them, so it’s very important to keep it stored out of reach.
  7. Pest Poison. Having a rat or mouse problem is no laughing matter, but neither is the use of poison which can also injure or kill our pets if mishandled! We recommend using traps instead of poison if you have household pets.
  8. Bonfire Safety. Bonfires are fun fall activities, but the flying sparks and hot coals can be dangerous for our pets! Make sure to always keep an eye on your best friend around fires.
  9. Hiking Safety. Fall has great weather for hiking adventures. If you’re taking your pet on a hike, be sure to dress them in orange if you’re in an area where hunting is allowed. Always keep their pest preventive up-to-date, carry plenty of drinking water for them, and check their paws after the hike to make sure no injury was incurred.
  10. Food Safety. During the holidays, our pets love being in on the action, but many of our holiday foods are dangerous for them to eat! Avoid feeding your pet such things as grapes, raisins, onions, garlic, poultry bones, chocolate, and more.

 

If you have questions about your pet’s safety this season, please contact the St. Marks Veterinary Hospital team. That’s what we’re here for!

Why Senior Wellness Care is So Important for Pets

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As our pets grow older, their bodies are changing and the team at St. Mark’s Veterinary Hospital is here to meet their needs. We provide senior wellness examinations specifically tailored to the unique needs of aging pets, and to your pet’s particular needs, depending on their age, health status, and more.

Our pets are prone to hiding signs of weakness, pain, and discomfort so we may not be able to identify health conditions in our own pets just by looking at them. For this reason, we recommend that all pets over the age of seven have biannual health checks with nose-to-tail examinations from our veterinarians. We may also prescribe detailed diagnostics to check for hidden health problems that can be identified through blood tests, urinalyses, fecal tests, and more.

How Can Senior Wellness Care Benefit Your Pet?

When your pet receives biannual check-ups in their senior years, their expected lifespan can increase! As we identify potential health problems early enough, treatment can be administered in a timely, more affordable, and more effective manner. Pets will have improved quality of life in their later years and may lead longer, happier lives as a result!

Schedule a Visit with the St. Mark’s Veterinary Hospital Team

If your pet is over the age of 7 and ready for a senior wellness check-up, we invite you to contact our team to get them headed in the right direction on the road to good health. Schedule a visit with us today!

Zoonotic Diseases

In 64 million American household’s pets are a source of joy and perhaps even the key to longer, healthier lives. However, pet-owning households with young children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems need to be aware that their animals can play host to disease-causing microorganisms.

Humans are not likely to catch a disease through their pets, but in very rare cases it can happen. Fortunately, most of these diseases rarely occur in healthy individuals, are mild and can be easily treated. Others, like toxoplasmosis, can be far more serious. Diseases transmitted from animals to humans are called zoonotic diseases. Zoonotic diseases usually live out their complex life cycles in animals, but sometimes cross into human bodies. Usually contracting a pet-borne disease requires very close contact with animals or their excretions, so zoonotic diseases can be avoided with common sense, cleanliness and regular pet examinations and vaccinations.

Children often put their hands in their mouths, providing an easy route for bacteria to travel into their bodies. For example, children who eat dirt are more susceptible to contracting zoonotic diseases. Children also are more susceptible to pet-borne illness because they carry fewer antibodies than adults do. The same holds true for puppies and kittens, making them more likely to carry disease than older dogs and cats.

Although the chances of getting a zoonotic disease from your pet are slim, these are some common pet-borne illnesses that can make people sick:

Salmonellosis

This bacteria generally makes its way into human bodies through contaminated food. The bacteria can be passed through animal feces and may cause symptoms like fever, vomiting, diarrhea and exhaustion.

Roundworms

Roundworm eggs and microscopic adult worms can be excreted in the feces of dogs and cats infected by the worms. Children may be at a higher risk for contracting roundworms because they play near pets or touch infected feces and put their hands into their mouths. Because of the risk to children, all cats and dogs should be taken to their veterinarians for regular fecal examinations. Also remember to cover all sandboxes when not in use to prevent children from contacting contaminated feces. Symptoms can include fever, cough, loss of appetite, weakness and lung congestion.

 

Cat Scratch Fever

This bacteria is usually transmitted from cats to humans through scratches. The bacteria is found on nails or claws and can cause high fever, loss of appetite, weakness and swollen lymph nodes. In otherwise healthy people, Cat Scratch Fever is usually mild and resolves itself. However, the bacteria caused by Cat Scratch Fever can be extremely dangerous or even fatal if left untreated in immune-compromised individuals. It’s important for these pet owners to tell their doctors they own a cat. Young children should be sure to wash scratches thoroughly with soap and water.

Strep Throat

Though your pet is probably not the culprit bringing strep into your household each year, the possibility does exist. Recently, researchers have found that it’s more likely that people are infecting their pets. In any case, keep your children from kissing, licking or exchanging food by mouth with their pets.
Ringworm

A fungal infection of the skin, hair or nails, ringworm starts as a rapidly spreading hairless, circular lesion. Humans can be infected through use of contaminated objects like hair brushes, towels or clothing or by contact with infected animals like cats, dogs, mice, rats and guinea pigs.

Scabies

Also called sarcoptic mange, scabies is a skin disease caused by itch mites which burrow under the skin. Scabies cause intense itching and scratching that can result in severe eczema. Humans can be infected through contact with infected animals.

The most effective way to prevent zoonotic diseases and ensure your good health is to ensure good health for your pets. This means taking your pet to the veterinarian for regular exams and vaccinations. Most pet owners find that by following their veterinarian’s nutritional and health recommendations, their pets will lead happy, healthy lives with little risk of zoonotic infections.

SOURCE: https://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/pet_health_library/general_health_care/diseases_transmitted_by_pets.aspx

Dental Disease: The Silent Killer

Cat and Dog Dental Disease

There is nothing pretty about pet dental disease, and unfortunately more than 70% of all pets have some form of it by the time they are only 3 years of age! Some of the negative results of this silent killer are:

  • Pain while eating
  • Tooth loss
  • Bad breath
  • The development of other diseases because of toxins seeping into the bloodstream
  • …and more

How to Offset Dental Disease for Your Pet

Offsetting dental disease can be done in a number of ways, the most important of which is professional veterinary dental care. When your pet comes in for their regular, annual check-ups, our dental team will examine their oral cavity to determine whether a professional dental cleaning is necessary for their care.

If a dental cleaning is recommended, our veterinary team will perform this procedure under anesthesia at a prescheduled time separate from your pet’s annual physical. During this procedure, your pet’s teeth with be scaled to remove tartar and plaque buildup, cleaned, and polished. Any diseased teeth may need to be extracted if they can’t be saved. Your pet will be safely monitored under anesthesia as they would be during any surgical procedure.

Continued Dental Care

After your pet’s professional dental, at-home dental care is important to keep their teeth from developing more tartar and plaque buildup. We can recommend a number of dental products for keeping your pet’s teeth clean. Please talk with our team today about the importance of proper preventive care for your pet’s oral health.